ADT grant boosts choice of local routes for walkers

Walkers in and around Alyth can now access an even bigger choice of routes thanks to a new leaflet part-funded by a grant from Alyth Development Trust.

The Trust’s Community Projects Fund has awarded £2,000 to cover the design, print and distribution costs of a second leaflet and map for the Alyth Path Network.  The leaflet greatly expands the network of paths outlined in the group’s first leaflet, produced last year.  In total, 2,000 copies of the first leaflet have been printed and are available via local outlets and walking groups, where they are being eagerly snapped up by keen walkers.

The Alyth Path Network – a group of volunteers dedicated to maintaining and promoting local country paths – believes that the second leaflet, entitled “WalkAlyth – Connecting Communities”, will bring even more visitors to the town as well as connecting them and local residents to neighbouring communities..

APN founder Ron McGill explains:  “Expanding our local walking opportunities brings great benefits for local businesses and the economy, as well as offering proven physical and mental health benefits for the local community and visitors.

“Walking is a lowcost activity and has a low impact on the environment, helping to tackle climate change.  Alyth is a very welcoming place with a rich history and wonderful rural environment, and its attractions are exemplified by the number of new housing developments taking place as well as major tourism investments such as the refurbished Alyth Hotel due to open next month.

“The routes we are promoting are all easily accessible by walkers of all abilities and are closely linked with local bus services.  We’re confident that this new leaflet will prove just as popular as the first, and we’re currently considering ideas for a weekend walking festival in Alyth to promote the network even further.”

As well as the printed leaflets, the entire Alyth Path Network is easily accessible online at https://alyth.online/walkalyth/.

ADT’s Community Projects Fund distributes the community benefit funds provided for Alyth by the operators of the Tullymurdoch Windfarm, some five miles north of the town.  Applications to the fund are judged by an independent panel of volunteers drawn from across the community.  Apply at https://lovealyth.org.uk/projects/alyth-community-projects-fund/.

Grant to help Alyth’s footballers stay in the game

Alyth’s football club is getting a helping hand from ADT’s Community Projects Fund.  

The independent panel that adjudicates applications to the fund has awarded £2000 to Alyth Amateur Football Club (AAFC) to help cover the substantial extra costs they’re facing as a result of the devastating fire that gutted the pavilion on the Jubilee Park.  As well as destroying a lot of equipment, the fire left AAFC with nowhere to train and play home games.  

Perth & Kinross Council, who own the pavilion, have been so far unable to agree the claim with the insurance company, so AAFC have had to hire pitches and training facilities in Blairgowrie.  This has severely depleted the Club’s funds, and although they are doing as much fund-raising as they can there was a very real question mark over AAFC’s long-term future.

L-r: Jenni Milne, her son Rohan Milne, and David Barclay of AAFC outside the Jubilee Park pavilion which is awaiting refurbishment following last year’s fire

AAFC’s Jenni Milne explained:  “The grant from ADT’s Community Projects Fund means that we can keep going on the present basis until at least the end of this season.  This is of great benefit to our players, supporters and the local community of which we are a part.

“The grant will support our own fund-raising efforts until as a club we can return home to the Diamond Jubilee Park in Alyth.  We’re determined to continue being part of Alyth’s community – which has always been so loyal to the Club in the past,” she added.

The Community Projects Fund distributes the community benefit funds provided for Alyth by the operators of the Tullymurdoch Windfarm, some five miles north of the town.  Applications to the fund are judged by an independent panel of volunteers drawn from across the community.  Apply at https://lovealyth.org.uk/projects/alyth-community-projects-fund/.

Boost for fans of Pickleball in Alyth

Fans of Pickleball in Alyth are getting a boost thanks to a grant from ADT’s Community Projects Fund.

Strathmore Pickleball, which was set up last year and meets every Thursday evening at the Airlie Street Hall, has been awarded £2000 to buy new equipment and pay for the hire of the Hall for six months.  

Club organiser Nicola Carrie (pictured above) said:  “Pickleball is a fun game to play that everyone can do. It is a very social game where people can meet others and hopefully make new friends. This grant will help us introduce pickleball to more people.

“Being a relatively new game – invented in the 1960s – that a lot of people don’t know about, we’re hoping to get different people to come and try it out, not just people who already play sports,” she added.

Pickleball is a mix of badminton, table tennis and tennis, played on a badminton court with a low net using paddles and a plastic ‘airflow’ ball.  It can be played inside or outside with different balls. The game is the fastest growing sport in America and when it is played in doubles it is a good game for everyone to play, even people with mobility issues.

Nicola said:  “So far we have been borrowing a net and paddles from Tennis Scotland, but new equipment will make us more reliant and better able to accommodate more people.”

As well as its regular weekly sessions, the Club is also running free ‘Come & Try’ sessions in Alyth Primary School hall on Tuesdays from 16 April – contact strathmorepickleballscot@gmail.com for more information, and get all the latest news from the Club’s Facebook page:  https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=61556617723008

ADT’s Community Projects Fund distributes the community benefit funds provided for Alyth by the operators of the Tullymurdoch Windfarm, some five miles north of the town.  Applications to the fund are judged by an independent panel of volunteers drawn from across the community.  Apply at https://lovealyth.org.uk/projects/alyth-community-projects-fund/.

New grant to provide more help for Alyth’s cyclists

Cyclists in Alyth will be be able to get expert help more frequently this year thanks to a grant from ADT’s Community Projects Fund.

Over the last couple of years, Dr Bike has been a fixture at the Summer and Winter Markets and one or two other community events, doing minor repairs for any cyclist who brings their machine along.  Callum Brooks and Neil Tuer from Alyth Cyclery on Commercial Street provide their expertise for free, along with minor replacement parts such as brake-blocks, if needed, to make sure Alyth’s cyclists are on road-worthy machines.

Callum (left) and Neil (right) pictured at Dr Bike’s base in Old Barony Church, Commercial Street.

The new grant will cover the costs of more frequent events during 2024, including not just the Summer Market in July but pop-ups around the town and perhaps even special sessions at the Primary School and elsewhere.  Dr Bike would be able to handle up to around 10 bikes per session.

Callum explained:  “We’ve run a few Dr Bike sessions in the past and we’ve always struggled with the format as its hard to predict how much work and new parts might be needed on each bike.

“This grant will enable us to run an in-store (and out of store during events) Dr Bike once a month for at least the Spring and Summer, with each session being widely promoted around the town.

“This is a locally-targetted effort to improve the value of each Dr Bike session, encouraging sustainable travel and benefitting the local community.  It’s very much aimed at the daily bicycle user who uses their bike instead of a car, which supports the improvement of the quality of life within the community and helps move transport within the town in a more sustainable direction,” he added.

ADT’s Community Projects Fund distributes the community benefit funds provided for Alyth by the operators of the Tullymurdoch Windfarm, some five miles north of the town.  Applications to the fund are judged by an independent panel of volunteers drawn from across the community.  Apply at https://lovealyth.org.uk/projects/alyth-community-projects-fund/.

Alyth set for spine-tingling Hallowe’en thanks to ADT grant

Alyth is set for a unique spine-tingling experience this Hallowe’en thanks to a grant from ADT’s Community Projects Fund.

For seven nights only between 27 October and 3 November, visitors and residents in Alyth will be encouraged to search for haunted scarecrows on display throughout the town.

Inspired by Alyth’s rich history of tales of ghosts and weird and wonderful happenings, local artist Jilly Henderson is inviting local people, groups and businesses to create their very own haunted scarecrow displays, resulting in a ‘putting Alyth on the map’ event.  It is thought to be the first such event ever staged in Scotland.

“I’m hoping local people will seize the opportunity to create an amazing Haunted Scarecrow Halloween scene – somewhere it can be viewed by passers-by…at the front of their home, in the garden, in a window, on a wall etc,” Jilly said.  “We plan to make available wooden frames for building the scarecrows and also run a pumpkin-carving workshop with free pumpkins, and we hope to organise a lantern parade on the first evening.”

Participants will be encouraged to let their imaginations run wild, using recycled materials such as items people have at home needing recycled, leaves, twigs, straw, clothing from Thrifty one, willow cut from the wild in and around Alyth. Scarecrows were traditionally made from bits and pieces lying around, so the Haunted Scarecrow Trail is itself recycling an old practice! Jilly created her own nine-foot woman with a skeleton dachshund, floating above the roadway outside her house, last Hallowe’en:

"Haunted scarecrow" created by Jilly Henderson
Haunted scarecrow at night

Jilly commented:  “I’m hoping this will create an innovative, family-friendly display in a collective event that helps build new friendships and connections and develop new crafting skills.  Having a community work together on a collective project is a wonderful thing, and bringing more visitors to the town would be great at that time of year.”

Jilly is planning extensive publicity to encourage families to walk around the town to explore the displays, and invite friends and family from out of town to visit.  The hope is that it could become an annual event, giving everyone something to collectively get involved with and look forward to as a town.

The CPF grant from ADT will cover design and print costs for posters, application forms and instruction/suggestion leaflets, and a route-map showing where the scarecrows are, as well as the workshop, wooden frames and basic materials.  Look out for more information later this year on how to get involved.

The Community Projects Fund distributes the community benefit funds provided for Alyth by the operators of the Tullymurdoch Windfarm, some five miles north of the town.  Applications to the fund are judged by an independent panel of volunteers drawn from across the community.  Apply at https://lovealyth.org.uk/projects/alyth-community-projects-fund/.

New lease on life for historic Alyth Kirk clock

John Smith of Alyth Parish Church with the historic Vulliamy clock mechanism
John Smith of Alyth Parish Church with the historic Vulliamy clock mechanism

Alyth Parish Church’s venerable clock is getting a new lease on life thanks in part to grants from Alyth Develoment Trust.

The clock chimes have been telling Alyth folk the time for almost 200 years apart from a few brief silences, most recently during the COVID lockdown.  Last year, the Kirk’s fabric committee decided to automate the clock’s winding mechanism and brought in specialists from the Cumbria Clock Company to advise on the best way of doing it.

They immediately recognised the clock as a rare and historic example of the work of Benjamin Lewis Vulliamy, clockmaker to Queen Victoria.  Alyth’s clock is one of only two in Scotland known to have been made by Benjamin, was one of the best clockmakers of his time –extremely well regarded in the horological world and a second generation master clockmaker.

He was five times master of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers, and clockmaker to King William IV then Queen Victoria, making many of the internal clocks in Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle, Kensington Palace, Clarence House and Brighton Pavilion and many of the other palaces that the royals use, as well as many of the internal clocks in the Houses of Parliament at Westminster. 

Alyth’s clock was made and installed in 1840, by which time Benjamin was a renowned master craftsman having already designed and fitted the clocks in the Royal Palaces. The bell in Alyth’s tower would have been supplied by him at the same time as the clock; it was cast by the Mears Foundry, who cast Big Ben for the Houses of Parliament.  

No-one knows how Alyth came to have a clock of this quality and expense, made to Vulliamy’s exacting standards.  The Cumbria Clock Company discovered that the clock has very little wear even after 183 years of service, and with automation should have at least another 183 years in it.

John Smith, Kirk Fabric Convener, said:  “Many of the local community had commented on missing the striking of the bell, and we wanted to bring the 180-year tradition back to Alyth.  After the work is done, the local community will be able to continue to see the time on the clock and again be able to hear the bell striking on the hour.

“The clock itself only requires a light servicing since it was made to such high standards, but this project will fit a new mechanism for automatic winding and to allow the chimes to be silenced over night – something the old mechanism didn’t allow.

“We’re pleased to be able to bring back the historic chimes to Alyth, and delighted to have found out that the town possesses such a rare and fine piece of clock engineering.”

The project is costing around £12,000.  The Kirk has already secured a grant of £3,000 from Perth & Kinross Heritage Trust and is seeking grants from other sources.  ADT is contributing £2,000 from its Community Projects Fund and will cover half of any shortfall from its strategic funds, with the other half coming from the Kirk’s own reserves.

Find out more about Benjamin Vulliamy here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Lewis_Vulliamy

ADT’s Community Projects Fund distributes the community benefit funds provided for Alyth by the operators of the Tullymurdoch Windfarm, some five miles north of the town.  Applications to the fund are judged by an independent panel of volunteers drawn from across the community.  Apply at https://lovealyth.org.uk/projects/alyth-community-projects-fund/

Please avoid Millhaugh site till works are complete

People are still going into the old sawmill site at Millhaugh and risking severe injury or worse. The warning signs and fencing are there for a reason while the site is being cleared and and its remaining structures made safe. Please spread the word, especially to all the kids/teenagers, that only licensed and fully-trained contractors are permitted to enter the site just now, and that anyone else going in is putting themselves in considerable danger!

PAGE TOP